card game tagged posts

Kickstarter: Vaults Impressions

A card game set in the steampunk world, where the goal is to assemble a crack team of vault breakers and try to collect enough wealth to become the richest crime lord in the city sounds like something that should have already existed. A concept so succinct and on point that it should be taken as a complete and utter failure of society that it didn’t exist previously. We’re all to blame on this one. Luckily, the folks over at Four Hogs are seeking to remedy that with their Kickstarted game VAULTS.

The core of the game is action management. Playing cards, gathering cards, cracking open safes, assembling or reorganizing your teams; all of these are choices that players can make that use up one or most of a set of actions that each players receives per turn. Players start each turn with 3 actions to use on the aforementioned choices of building up a team, trying to crack a vault, or gathering more cards to find the perfect team member or piece of equipment for the next job.

Read More

Arena Review: Cards Against Humanity Third Expansion

In our initial review of the card game Cards Against Humanity, we commented that one of the potential issues is a level of fatigue that can set in from playing the game too often. One of the best solutions to this issue is to simply issue more cards to help keep the game fresh. Coming off of PAX EAST 2013, a third expansion for the game has been released.

Cards Against Humanity is a party game for horrible people. Unlike most of the party games you’ve played before, Cards Against Humanity is as despicable and awkward as you and your friends.

Suggested ages: 17 and up
Number of players: 4 to 20+
Playing time: 30 to 90 minutes
Contents: 112 cards (75 white and 25 black, 8 blank white cards, 4 blank black cards)
Retail price: $10 on Amazon
*Note: This expansion requires the core game to play.

Cards Against Humanity has become one of my go to games for large gatherings. The rules are simple, there’s really no need to keep score, and the game is social enough that over a dozen people can play at the same time, with no real change to game play. Trying to “win” isn’t really part of the core experience.

Right in time for PAX EAST 2013, a third expansion to the adult themed card game was released. If you’ve played the core Cards Against Humanity, you’re about to get more of the same. There are no new mechanics, card types or anything that changes the original experience. Something that was true about the last expansion as well. Players still play topic cards (white cards) in order to answer questions or complete sentences Mab Lib style (black cards). The cards are then judged by one player and a winner is selected. Rinse and repeat.

Read More

Arena Review: DC Deck-Building Game

Deck building games may have finally gone mainstream. In the span of a few months, Marvel and Upperdeck teamed up to produce Legendary while DC Comics and Cryptozoic joined forces for the blandly named DC Deck-Building Game.

I wish I were kidding.

Read More

Arena Review: Cards Against Humanity Second Expansion

In our initial review of the card game Cards Against Humanity, we commented that one of the potential issues is a level of fatigue that can set in from playing the game too often. One of the best solutions to this issue is to simply issue more cards to help keep the game fresh. After an initial expansion launched along with the core game we now have the “Second Expansion.”

Cards Against Humanity is a party game for horrible people. Unlike most of the party games you’ve played before, Cards Against Humanity is as despicable and awkward as you and your friends.

Suggested ages: 17 and up
Number of players: 4 to 20+
Playing time: 30 to 90 minutes
Contents: 112 cards (75 white and 25 black, 8 blank white cards, 4 blank black cards)
Retail price: $10 on Amazon
*Note: This expansion requires the core game to play.

If you’ve played the core Cards Against Humanity, you’re about to get more of the same. There are no new mechanics, card types or anything that changes the original experience. Players still play topic cards (white cards) in order to answer questions or complete sentences Mab Lib style (black cards). The cards are then judged by one player and a winner is selected. Rinse and repeat.

Read More

Game Review: Munchkin’s Monster Enhancers

It’s useful that Steve Jackson Games tends to print a bunch of products around the same time so I can just buy a bunch of them and flood my Munchkin decks with new cards. So while Munchkinomicon adds a whole new element to the game, Monster Enhancers takes what works and just gives you more of it – messing with people during combat!

Are you tired of beating up on wimpy monsters? Of course not: you’re a munchkin!

Are you tired of watching your opponents beat up on wimpy monsters? Of course you are: you’re a munchkin!

Contents: 15 Door cards and rules insert
Usable with: ANY Munchkin game, but designed for Munchkin Prime
Retail Price: $4.99, available at Amazon or Warehouse 23

Read More

Game Review: Munchkin’s Munchkinomicon

It’s always exciting when something new and weird gets released for Munchkin. After the fiasco of finally obtaining Munchkin Zombies, the glitz and glam of the game began to wear off and my friends soon returned to Munchkin Prime. But even with six expansions all cobbled together in one amazing mess, we’re always interested in something new and different that doesn’t break the game.

I adore the little expansions for Munchkin that come in booster packs. Fairy Dust is fun (but makes elves even more annoying) and Waiting for Santa and Santa’s Revenge are a hoot in December to play, but I’ve been looking for something different and then Munchkinomicon got released!

It’s the ultimate book of spells . . . the Munchkinomicon. But beware! If you aren’t munchkinly enough, the Munchkinomicon will slip away and find a more suitable host.

Contents: Munchkinomicon treasure, 14 Spells & Rule Insert

Usable with: ANY Munchkin game, but is not a stand alone

Retail Price: $4.99, available at Amazon or Warehouse 23

Read More

Game Review: Once Upon a Time (Second Edition)

Growing up in the age of the video game, I find myself lagging behind when it comes to tabletop and card games. That’s probably why, to this point, I’ve missed out on Once Upon a Time the fantastic card game originally released back in 1995. It is a bit of a different game as the win conditions aren’t nearly as important as the game itself, but to this point I’ve encountered few games that are better served for a large group of friends.

Once Upon A Time is a game in which the players create a story together, using cards that show typical elements from fairy tales. One player is the Storyteller, and creates a story using the ingredients on her cards. She tries to guide the plot towards her own ending. The other players try to use cards to interrupt her and become the new Storyteller. The winner is the first player to play out all her cards and end with her Happy Ever After card.

Suggested ages: 10 and up
Number of players: 3 – 6+
Playing time: 1 to 2 hours
Includes: 165 cards, rule sheet
Retail price: $24.99, available at Amazon or Warehouse 23

To a certain extent, once must enjoy storytelling and have some creative pre-disposition in order to play. The cards themselves don’t tell the story, instead they provide the direction and the players are meant to fill in the gaps. That means the game requires more active participation than others. I certainly wouldn’t count that as a negative for the game, but it does mean that some people are going to be turned off by it. If you don’t like telling stories or engaging in games of the imagination, then this probably won’t appeal to you.

Read More